E-GOVERNANCE CONCEPTS AND CASE STUDIES BY C.S.R.PRABHU PDF

Dimensions: 8. As of December , it was projected that the number of people incarcerated in the United States would reach 2 million in This is the world Conover enters when he, along with other new recruits, undergoes seven weeks of pseudomilitary preparation at the Albany Training Academy. Conover correctly and vividly captures the essence of that life, its tedium interspersed with the adrenaline rush of an "incident" and the edge of fear that accompanies every action.

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Dimensions: 8. As of December , it was projected that the number of people incarcerated in the United States would reach 2 million in This is the world Conover enters when he, along with other new recruits, undergoes seven weeks of pseudomilitary preparation at the Albany Training Academy.

Conover correctly and vividly captures the essence of that life, its tedium interspersed with the adrenaline rush of an "incident" and the edge of fear that accompanies every action.

He also details how the guards experience their own feelings of confinement, often at the hands of the inmates: A consequence of putting men in cells and controlling their movements is that they can do almost nothing for themselves. For their various needs they are dependent on one person, their gallery officer.

Instead of feeling like a big, tough guard, the gallery officer at the end of the day often feels like a waiter serving a hundred tables or like the mother of a nightmarishly large brood of sullen, dangerous, and demanding children. And not taking to it nicely often involves violence. Indeed, the constant potential for violence on any scale makes even humdrum assignments dangerous. But beneath the simmering rage rests an unexpected sensitivity that Conover captures brilliantly.

After encountering a Hispanic inmate with a tattoo of a heartbreaking passage from The Diary of Anne Frank on his back, he writes: "It was easier to stay incurious as an officer. This riveting book goes further. Stymied by both the union and prison brass in his effort to report on correctional officers, Conover instead applied for a job, and spent nearly a year in the system, mostly at Sing Sing, the storied prison in the New York City suburbs.

Whether working the gallery, the mess hall or transportation detail, the job is both a personal and moral challenge: at the isolation unit "the Box" , Conover begins to write up his first "use of force" incident when a fellow officer waves him away.

He steps back to offer a history of the prison, the "hopelessly compromised" work of prison staff and the unspoken idealism he senses in fellow guards. Stressed by his double life and the demands of the job, caught between the warring impulses of anthropological inquiry and "the incuriosity that made the job easier," Conover struggles but nevertheless captures scenes of horror and grace. With its nuanced portraits of officers and inmates, the book never preaches, yet it conveys that we ignore our prisons--an explosive and expensive microcosm of race and class tensions--at our collective peril.

Agent, Kathy Robbins. First serial to the New Yorker. From Library Journal Having already documented the lives of illegal aliens Coyotes and hoboes Rolling Nowhere , journalist Conover gives a compelling firsthand account of life as a corrections officer. Refused entry as a journalist, Conover actually attended the training academy and became a bona fide officer for a year. Once on the job, he appears to have identified completely with the persona of a prison guard: He feels his head swim as he tries to enforce rules that are routinely ignored to avoid confrontations.

He braces himself to walk the galleries amid catcalls and threats of violence and tries to keep on top of the games inmates play. Given the monotony, dehumanization, and imminent dangers, why would anyone choose this profession? A good accompanying volume is Lucien X.

Furthermore, some officersDnot allDcan wield a kind of power hard to emulate in the outside world. Highly recommended for public and academic libraries.

Most helpful customer reviews 5 of 6 people found the following review helpful. In our every day society we meet all types of people. Human psychology is such that we all have to have someone to look down on.

We simply have to be better than many of the other folks in our world. We look down on liberals, or conservatives. We feel superior to our bosses, or gays, minorities, atheists, or trailer trash. In prison there are only two classes of people: guards and those who are guarded.

And each class finds the other group inferior. Wait a minute. I should have said there are three classes. Senior COs also look down on junior officers. Prisoner abuse? What about guard abuse? Surprisingly the COs seem to be the subject of nearly constant harassment by the prisoners.

The prisoners, having time on their hands, love to confront COs, and shower them with epithets. And, as I mentioned earlier, Senior COs harass guards who are one step lower than they are. What are the rewards of such a job? As far as I can determine there are none whatsoever. The pay is not good. Most of those around you hate you, or at best tolerate you, and never expect someone to say that you are doing good work.

The rules are applied so ambiguously and inconsistently that you are constantly frustrated. The fear also never seems to go away. Sometimes the pent up stress is relieved in physical contact between prisoners and their keepers generally initiated by the prisoners.

Better, perhaps than going home and beating up the wife, and kicking the dog. This is a very interesting book, and while the author does not really get into the heads of the COs and the felons, it is a tale not often heard. Hardly the image of a big, tough correctional officer.

He is also exceptionally articulate, able to express thoughts, feelings and impressions better than anyone I have ever listened to. Having met him before reading "Newjack" was a rare pleasure because it added a context to the book that most readers never get. It is about how a self professed liberal is changed by his surroundings.

It is about a man confronting the fear and predudice that resides in all of us, and trying to come to terms with it.

It is also about the American justice system good and bad and those on each side of the bars. Bits and Pieces By Joseph S. Walker Conover is a talented writer, and many of the individual chapters here are wonderful. Incorporating the history of Sing Sing--and, to an extent, of American jails in general--into his present-day depiction of the prison is a nice touch. The book should be read by anyone interested in how our recent mania for incarceration is affecting society. This may be a necessary evil resulting from the grind of endlessly repetitious eight hour shifts, but for me it keeps the book from five stars.

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GARBOLOGY EDWARD HUMES PDF

E-Governance – Concepts and Case Studies

Condition: As New. Contents: Preface. What is e-Governance? E-Governance Models.

EL SOLICITANTE DESCOLOCADO PDF

C S R Prabhu

More than two decades of pioneering work and experience of the author C. Prabhu during his tenure in NIC is reflected in this book that provides a panoramic view and insight relating to e-Governance development initiatives in India. Additionally, the e-Government initiatives were pioneered in the state of Andhra Pradesh and Mr. A word of caution though for the readers- the case studies mentioned and the inferences drawn are the views of the author and not of a jury of experts from different domain areas of e-Government. Chapter one provides the conceptual overview of e-Governance along with the history and present trends in the domain.

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